OPA Newsletter January 2001

OLD PHAROSIANS' ASSOCIATION

NEWSLETTER

    New Series No. 79

Jan 2001

Officers and Committee Members
President's Message
The Annual Meeting and Dinner 2000
Annual Football Match
From The Committee Room
Gift Aid
Mrs. E. King
Always Pleased To Help
Archivist's Corner

NEWS OF THE SCHOOL
Comings and Goings
Prize Givings
Sixty Years On
News gathered from the "First Thursday" Newsletters

NEWS OF OLD BOYS
Obituaries
Members still Living and Learning

NEWS OF THE ASSOCIATION
OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE 2000-2001

PRESIDENT: Phil Janaway
73 Lewisham Road
River, Dover
CT17 0QG
01304 822740

VICE-PRESIDENT Denis Doble
4 Paverley Drive
Morgan's Walk,
Battersea,
London SW11 3TP

PAST PRESIDENT: Rev. John Philpott
The Vicarage
45 Bewsbury Cross Lane
Whitfield, Dover
CT16 3EZ
01304 820314

SECRETARY: Philip Harding
6 Chestnut Road, Elms Vale
Dover CT17 9PY
01304 205007
e-mail: phil@ksfa.freeserve.co.uk

ASSISTANT SECRETARY: Graham Tutthill

TREASURER: Ian Pascall
‘Karibu’ 45A Bewsbury Cross Lane
Whitfield, Dover CT16 3EZ
01304 821187
e-mail: pascallian@aol.com

MEMBERSHIP Jean Luckhurst
SECRETARY: Dover Grammar School for Boys
Dover, CT17 0DQ
01304 206117

NEWSLETTER Terry Sutton MBE
EDITORS: 17 Bewsbury Cross Lane,
Whitfield, Dover CT16 3HB
01304 820122
e-mail: terry.sutton@route56.co.uk
and
Graham Tutthill
21 Orchard Drive, River, Dover
CT17 OND
01304 822121
e-mail: graham@tutthill.freeserve.co.uk

ARCHIVIST: Peter Burville
Seagate, Goodwin Road
St. Margaret's Bay, Dover CT15 6ED
01304 853267
e-mail: pjburville@btinternet.com

COMMITTEE: Mike Palmer (to retire 2001)
Barry Crush (to retire 2001)
Reg Colman (to retire 2002)
Tom Beer (to retire 2002)
Roger Gabriel (to retire 2003)
Maurice Smith (to retire 2003)

AUDITOR: Neil Beverton

HEADMASTER: Neil Slater

STAFF Malcolm Grant, Dr Alan Jackson,
REPRESENTATIVES: Francoise Lloyd

HEAD PREFECT: Ritchie Hulks

INTERNET ADDRESS: www.rmplc.co.uk/eduweb/sites/dovergramboys/index.html

E-MAIL ADDRESS: pharos@dovergramboys.kent.sch.uk

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

I consider it an honour and a privilege to be the President of the Old Pharosians’ Association for the year 2000-2001. I am pleased to report on a well attended annual general meeting in September at which members were willing to renew their service to the Association and the School. Many of those present had travelled considerable distances and the Association is grateful to them and to all who loyally attended. In the sunshine of the afternoon quite a few OP’s supported the younger Old Boys demonstrating their soccer skills against the School 1st XI. The Association is grateful to Mike Palmer and his helpers, and to Malcolm Grant for again making this annual fixture possible.

The Annual Reunion Dinner, expertly and thoroughly organised by Maurice Smith, was attended by eighty-seven O.P’s. Two speeches were delivered by the Headmaster Neil Slater, and myself. Neil spoke with obvious pride of the recent accommodation improvements to the Sixth Form area and the construction of rooms to house the new computer suites, all of which are now accessed by a newly constructed tower. I spoke of the shared pleasure of so many O.P’s attending the Dinner and recognising old friends; of my memories of the School during the war-time evacuation to Wales and of the immediate post war years (and of certain members of staff with affection), but I attempted to place these memories within the context of those permanent themes which exist within the on-going life of the School, and therefore identifiable by Old Boys of all ages. Members were entertained by the singing of a local O.P, Steve Yarrow. His choice of songs proved to be very popular and enjoyable. Members might wish to know that I sent a bouquet of flowers to Mrs. Anne Booth who still lives locally, the widow of former Headmaster, J. C. Booth. I received a very appreciative letter of thanks in which she spoke of her pleasure of still being remembered at the age of 95 and ¾ years.

I was recently invited to represent the Association at the School’s Carol Service to contribute to a festive celebration of music by the School Choir and instrumentalists, the reading of nine lessons and the congregation singing traditional carols. The church was full of parents and friends sharing a most successful service.

I have recently written a letter on behalf of the Association to those boys who left the school last July, and who will have just completed their first term at university or their first period of their chosen career, to establish a line of communication between them and the Association and to invite them to become members (at an initially reduced membership fee).

The Association will continue to work for the greater involvement of Old Boys, to act as a focal point of global communication and information and to encourage new membership as a celebration of those years at the School on the hill. The committee has expressed support for the organising of local or district reunions of which the London Reunion is an example - successfully organised by John Booth and Tony Bradley. On behalf of the members of the Association’s committee, I wish you a happy and successful year 2001. Please continue to contact the Association and the School and let us know how you are and where you are.

Phil Janaway, President

THE ANNUAL MEETING AND DINNER

Nearly 90 old boys and their guests attended the association's annual reunion dinner at the School in September when our new President, Phil Janaway, took the chair.

The annual meeting was held in the morning when Phil (at the school 1943-52) was elected President.

Head teacher Neil Slater welcomed the sense of historical links that old boys gave to the school and reported that the school was going from strength to strength. The headmaster said the number of boys on the roll was now in the 650s and he expected it to increase by a further 20 next year and then stabilise. He mentioned the acute shortage of suitable teachers but, despite this, the number of staff had increased from a low point of 26 to 45, some of whom were part-time. "I must say I have much greater confidence in the future of the school, much more than I had in the past," said Mr Slater.

Phil Janaway, a former deputy head of Astor School and the President of Dover Operatic and Dramatic Society (DODS), paid tribute to the work of the retiring association President, the Reverend John Philpott.

He recalled the war years of evacuation in Wales and how headmaster J.C. Booth had managed to keep the school together through such a difficult time. "In a way, we too were immigrants, or maybe refugees, fleeing a war," he commented. Phil highlighted his memories and the kindness of staff members including Ted Archer, Ken Ruffell and Bill Jacques whose teaching methods he himself found echoing when a master in classrooms at Astor.

"When we attend reunions, we look for friends. But we also look for a continuation of the essence of the school as we knew it," added Phil in proposing the toast to the school.

During the dinner Old Pharosian Steve Yarrow (a leading member of DODS) and Hannah Barnett (whose brother Matthew was a pupil at the school from 1986 to 1991) entertained with songs and music.

Among those at the dinner were Dr. George Curry (1927-36) who had travelled from Florida and Richard Spear (1941-46) who lives in British Columbia, Canada.

At the annual meeting the Rev. John Philpott (1955-62) handed over the Presidency to Phil Janaway. Treasurer Ian Pascall explained that the committee had carried out the membership's instructions and spent around £4,000 during the year on equipment and other items for the school. Reserves were now down to just over £4,000 but year-on-year the association was just about keeping its head above water. Each Newsletter was costing between £350-£400 to publish and to post.

The election of officers resulted: Vice-President - Denis Doble (1948-55), secretary - Phil Harding, assistant secretary - Graham Tutthill, treasurer - Ian Pascall, membership secretary - Mrs. Jean Luckhurst at the school, Newsletter editors - Terry Sutton and Graham Tutthill, archivist - Dr Peter Burville, auditor - Neil Beverton. Roger Gabriel and Maurice Smith (who organised his 15th annual dinner) were re-elected to the committee. Staff members elected to the committee were Malcolm Grant and French teacher Madame Francoise Lloyd and it was pointed out it was probably the first time a lady had served on the OP's committee.

One suggestion made, to be investigated by the committee, is the appointment of a website editor to keep old boys around the world up to date on school and association activities.

After the meeting some members took up the headmaster's offer of a tour of the new buildings, including the new tower and computer suites, at the school.

ANNUAL FOOTBALL MATCH

A number of late withdrawals left the Old Boys' side for this year's annual football match somewhat depleted. Indeed, two members of the School's squad were "borrowed" to make the XI and then an injury in the early stages means that the Old Boys had to play most of the game with only 10 men. It was therefore not surprising that, after a competitive first half in which the Old Boys restricted the School lead to 2-1, the School dominated the second, retaining the Andrew Kremer Memorial Cup by a final score of 8-2. The Old Boys were represented by Michael Robinson, Russell Cramphorn, Simon Gretton, Jeff Vane, Adrian Bailes, Gary Beeden, Paul Henwood, John Spence, John Stonebridge, Michael Abbott and Peter Elms.

Mick Palmer

FROM THE COMMITTEE ROOM

Your committee met in November when the meeting was chaired by President Phil Janaway, with another 10 members present, and apologies from seven. The treasurer’s report revealed £4,699 in our various accounts.

Thanks were expressed to Maurice Smith for his customary hard work and efficiency in organising the annual dinner.

There was considerable discussion - not for the first time - about how to keep in contact with boys in the first few years after they leave the school and go on to university or employment. The President offered to write a letter to the year 2000 leavers, which the Secretary distributed during Christmas and New Year holiday period when most were home from university. It is hoped that a closer contact can be made and kept with leavers in future years. The President is to speak to Upper Sixth a couple of weeks before examinations commence in May, and letters will be sent to them just before they leave in June inviting them to bring completed membership forms with them on leaving day. We are grateful to Francoise Lloyd who has offered to chase these up on the day. Further letters will be available on examination results day and will be sent during Christmas holidays.

Among the topics discussed by the committee was a suggestion that previous editions of this newsletter could be made available on CD. The possibility of appointing a website manager will be discussed at the next meeting which is due to take place at the school on Tuesday 13 March at 7 p.m.

GIFT AID

In November 1999 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that he would be changing the tax regime on donations to charities. This was the campaign for "Getting Britain Giving" and brings the UK more or less into line with the US pattern. The new rules came into effect on 6 April 2000, and this article is to explain to members how they can help The Old Pharosians financially under these rules.

Up to 5 April, the tax on a donation (normally called the annual subscription) could only be recovered if it was given under a Deed of Covenant for at least 4 years. Many members of The Old Pharosians have given in this fashion.

From 6 April this year tax can be recovered on all donations by taxpayers, whether regular or one-off. This system is known as Gift Aid and there is no minimum figure.

Gift Aid donations have to be clearly identified as to donor, and documented in an approved manner. If this is done, then The Old Pharosians can recover tax on these donations at the rate of 22/78 of the donation. The donor can claim tax relief at his/her highest rate against either Income Tax or Capital Gains Tax.

If you wish to help The Old Pharosians financially, the actions that I would ask you to take are:

If within the last 3 years, you have completed a Deed of Covenant to The Old Pharosians, with a first payment prior to 6th April 2000, then you need do nothing. The Old Pharosians can reclaim the tax without any further action on your part. When your covenant expires I shall write to you and invite you to complete a Gift Aid Declaration for future years. (If you are not sure when you signed a Covenant, please contact me).

Whether you are paying by cheque or by Standing Order, please sign a Gift Aid Declaration form to cover this and future years. (This can apply to any donation already made since 6th April 2000). You can specify the final year of payment if you wish to cancel at any future date. These forms are available from me. I can either send a form for you to complete or I can take the details over the phone or via e-mail and send you a written copy for confirmation. (These methods are newly legal under Gift Aid regulations). There will then be no need to complete a form in each subsequent year.

Please pay by Standing Order if you are not already doing so, as it helps us with the tracing of transactions for any possible audit by the tax authorities. The S.O. form has to be signed by you in the original. Blank forms are available from myself.

Thank you for your assistance

Ian Pascall November 2000
Tel 01304 821187 Fax 01304 208497
E-mail pascallian@aol.com

MRS. E. KING

The association announces with regret the death of Mrs. Ethel (Gloria) King at Riverhead, Sevenoaks on Christmas Eve 2000. She was five months short of her 100th birthday.

Mrs King, as many will remember, was in charge of cooking arrangements for the school shortly after the school's return from evacuation. She devoted many hours, over the years, to feeding our hungry ones despite the immediate post-war food shortages. She continued to be interested in the school long after her retirement. She attended the annual dinner in September 1990 as a guest of the then newly-elected President William Fittall (1964-72). William attended the funeral at Tunbridge Wells in January to represent the Old Pharosians' Association and our President Phil Janaway.

ALWAYS PLEASED TO HELP

We received an e-mail from Robert Needham, in Hampshire, asking if we could help him track down an old university friend, Simon Matthews (1977-84). "From what I can recall he went to a Grammar School in Dover which I am assuming was yours. I thought I would contact you in case he remained as one of your 'Old Boys' and kept in touch with the school - he did well at university gaining a 1st class honours in Applied Biology. I lost contact with him shortly after graduation - I know he was a member of the YCA and that he was at one time working abroad in Australia. But that is all I know." Sure enough, we were able to put them in contact and they are now keeping up to date with each other's progress.

In the last newsletter we asked if anyone could help Freda Robbins, from Maidstone, with a copy of "Buckland 1852 -1952" by Miss O.M. Rookwood, who was a teacher at our school in the 1940s, to help with family research. Our thanks to those who responded immediately, and Freda now has a copy.

ARCHIVIST'S CORNER

Greetings! Your archive team, which includes Arthur Tolputt (1934-40) and Norman Woolhouse (1946-52), continue to come up to the School on an occasional basis - mostly Monday mornings, and are pleased to welcome visitors. Recently, past-president Dr Ken Lott (1945-53) called in at the School. Ken has offered to help naming people on the July 1946 panoramic photograph. Recently Colin Bailey (1941-48) has also provided some names so we should soon have quite a substantial number of people named (only one name per person, if possible!).

Perhaps some of you remember Professor James Hancock (1941-1948). Recently Charles Hutchins (1936-41), an old BT colleague of mine, rang to say his widow has kindly offered to send us some material for the archives. Records from the war period are rather sparse, but not the memories.

Both Mrs. Turnpenny and Mrs Olive Winter, widow of Bob Winter (1934-41), have donated material relating to the death of Mr Whitehouse and the memorial dedicated to him in 1950. My school-boy diary, of the time, refers to us boys attending the unveiling service.

Colin Henry (1945-50) has donated material, including Speech Day 1946 which included a list of Old Boys’ war distinctions, as has ex-teacher Maurice Smith (1959+), who seems to have an inexhaustible supply!

Graham Bayford, who with his brother John was at the School from 1953 to 1956, sent a copy of the School athletics team and soccer 2nd XI of 1955. An added bonus was a full set of names of those featured.

Following our meeting at the annual dinner, Martyn Webster (1960-67) has sent copies of the photographs of the 1960 first & second year choir (with many names), and the July 1961 form 1B visit to Dover Castle.

Rex Fletcher (1970-78), who lives in the USA, responded to an earlier request for a School photograph from Mr Colman’s tenure (1969-90), by stating he would like one from his time at the School. As previously mentioned, we eventually hope to offer photographs on CD but at the moment we are not able to progress that particular project.

Where are they now?

Past-president Tony Bradley (1945-52) asked about school-chums Roger T. Burbridge (1945-1949), who went to the USA, and Malcolm Julian Edwards (1945-1951). Can anyone shed any light on their recent whereabouts?

The season’s greetings to you (if a little late).

Peter Burville

CONGRATULATIONS

Mrs. Ann Booth (widow of former headmaster J.C. Booth) celebrated her 96th birthday in December, and our oldest Old Pharosian Mrs. Lily Turnpenny is due to celebrate her 108th birthday in February. We send our best wishes to both of these remarkable ladies.

NEWS OF THE SCHOOL

COMINGS AND GOINGS

The new school year started in September with the arrival of 111 boys in Year 7 and other years, and nine new members of staff.

Rosemary Ball is a new part-time teacher of psychology. Vincent Crofts is a part-time teacher of law. Michael Harrison is subject leader for economics and business studies and will also teach politics, and Pauline Harrison is a part-time teacher of business studies. Roger McCracken has joined the design and technology department, Daniel Morrissey is teaching sociology, sports studies and history, and Christopher Mortimer is the new IT technician working at both our school and the Girls' Grammar School. Ben Ralph is teaching geography and games, and Carmel Spencer, who graduated in New Zealand, is teaching science.

Five of these posts are new, four to staff new A level courses in the sixth form, and the fifth to look after the new ICT equipment.

In January Stephen Nugus became Head of Science.

Susan Rose married during the summer holidays and is now Susan Clough.

Steve Bailey, who taught geography and sports studies, left to become Head of Geography at King's School in Canterbury, Jeremy Michaels (PE and games) went to Sittingbourne Community College, and Tasneem Shafi (economics and business studies) has joined Dulwich International College in Thailand.

At the end of the summer term, Maurice Smith, on behalf of the Association, went to the school and presented Old Pharosians' ties to Steve Bailey, Dave Murray and Malcolm Grant to mark their Honorary Membership of the Association having completed 25 years' service. A similar presentation has also been made to Kevin Raine, who retired as Head of Science after a long spell of absence through ill-health.

EXAM RESULTS

This year broke the long run of improvements in A level results with an average candidate score of 19.0, still respectable, but not as good as last year. Every candidate gained at least two A level passes thereby qualifying for entrance to university. Among the outstanding successes were Michael Roberts who gained a place at Selwyn College, Cambridge, to read Mathematics, Mark Gabriel with a place at St. Catherine's College, Oxford, to read Mathematics and Computing, and Daniel Trenowden with a place at Leeds to read Law.

The GCSE results were up on last year and the year before, especially pleasing because this was the first group who entered the school under our own admissions arrangements. Top scorers were Stuart Inglis (9A*s, 1A), Giles Barrett (7A*s, 3As), and Nicholas Hayward and Benjamin Langley (7A*s, 2As 1B).

PRIZE GIVINGS

President Phil Janaway presented the prizes at the school's guest
evening on Friday September 15. Old Pharosian John English (1966-73) returned to the school on Thursday 9 November to present the records of achievement, GCSE certificates and Year 11 prizes. John has also been chairman of the governors and is a parent at the school.

SIXTY YEARS ON

Sixty years ago boys from our school, evacuated to South Wales, were being easily beaten at rugby by the boys of Ebbw Vale County School. Not surprising. They had been playing the game for years. Our school for a few months.

Now Dover Rugby Football Club is planning to send an Under-14s team back to South Wales for possible revenge! Club President is Maurice Sayers (1939-42) who was one of those young rugby players in Ebbw Vale all those years ago. There are currently seven boys from our school regularly training and playing in the team, one of whom is also in the Kent team.

Gareth, from our school, is the son of Tony Hewer who was a pupil at Ebbw Vale Grammar School. Richard Catt, chairman of the youth section of Dover RFC, points out it's going to cost money to send the Dover lads to Wales and Ebbw Vale. So he and his club are organising a series of fund-raising events. The first is a cabaret evening on 10 February. Anyone who wants more information can contact Mr Catt on his work number 01304 203443.

NEWS GATHERED FROM THE
"FIRST THURSDAY" NEWSLETTERS

The cost of a school lunch increased to £1.40 in September. The school runs its own catering concession.

Various educational trips have taken place during the summer and autumn terms, including to La Coupole, Tate Modern, British Museum, Museum of London, the Houses of Parliament, The Somme, Hastings, Salisbury and Cologne.

Year 12 students took part in a Youth Crime and Punishment conference and a political conference, both in London, and visited Canterbury Crown Court.

About 10 students from Years 12 and 13 have been invited to take part in a European Work Placement/exchange in Brittany in April this year. Students from a school in Southern Germany visited the school in September.

The "Jeans for Genes" Day raised £580 .

In July, 12 sixth form art students visited Demelza House Children's Hospice near Sittingbourne for the unveiling of their panels produced during art lessons and free periods. The Hospice authorities had asked our boys to produce these panels following the success of a similar project two years earlier.

A Summer School for 27 highly able children from Years 6 and 7 was held for the first time at our school. Activities included visits to St. Augustine's Abbey in Canterbury and the historic town of Montreuil in France, drama based on the Canterbury Tales, measuring the height of the school flagpole and learning about the Dover Bronze Age boat. The children produced work in English, History, Maths, Science and French.

The school's musicians presented their annual summer concert in July, and performed at the Junior Prize Giving the same month, Guest Evening in September, a Flower Festival concert at Charlton Church, the autumn concert following the Governors' Annual Parents' Meeting in October, and the GCSE Prize Giving in November. The music was at its usual very high standard at the annual Service of Nine Lessons and Carols by Candlelight in December at Charlton Church at which our President read one of the lessons.

CCF cadets took part in the annual national shooting competition at Aldershot in September. Brigadier Trevor Minter, Deputy Constable of Dover Castle, was the Inspecting Officer for the biennial inspection.

The Staff v Prefects cricket match, played at Crabble, resulted in a five-run win for the Staff.

Our Year 8 boys won the annual seven-a-side football tournament for the second successive year.

Year 10 made the school's first ever foray into the Daily Mail's Schools Rugby Cup competition playing host to Clofe's School of Lee, South East London, at Crabble. Although we were beaten, 12-22, our boys did themselves and the school proud.

NEWS OF OLD BOYS

OBITUARIES

BOD BOWLES (1941-47)

Few old boys could have received such a splendid send-off.

A police escort closed off the roads as a jazz band and more than one hundred friends walked to church for the funeral of Robert "Bod" Bowles.

Bod, who died aged 70 in October, was the owner of the Louis Armstrong pub (once The Grapes) in Maison Dieu Road which he turned into a centre for jazz in East Kent. His widow Jackie and their two daughters were determined to give Bod a good send-off, before cremation at Barham.

Two jet black horses hauled the hearse in front of which marched, in New Orleans' jazz style, a 14-piece band. Behind followed more than a hundred friends, old school mates, pub customers, and those who just love jazz. They all processed to St. Paul's RC Church where Bod's family had worshipped for years. As the coffin was carried into church the jazz band played "When The Saints Go Marching In".

Inside the church, school "old boy" Bill Barnacle and his six-strong jazz band played Bod's favourites including his signature tune "The White Cliffs of Dover".

One-time classmate, and best man at Bod's wedding, John "Shuny" Talbot (1942-47), now living in Bristol, recalled some of the highlights of Bod's life that made him such a character in the Dover area. John recalled how Bod's former classmate Terry Sutton, while serving in the Hussars in North Africa, had discovered Bod on a quayside negotiating the sale of blankets to an Arab--while another Arab held his rifle! John, now an experienced trumpeter, told how Bod had introduced him to jazz many years ago.

Father John Ryan, conducting the service, noted one of the tunes played by the jazzmen--"Over In The Glory Land".

There were many school old boys at the church and at the wake that followed in the "Louis." "Met" Simmonds (1941-1947) had to be re-introduced to his old classmate Colin Chapman. Time changes us all! Bob Adams (1955-59), John Talbot's son Steve (1971-78), retired solicitor Maurice Sayers (1939-42), and rock drummer Nick Headon (1967-73) were just some of the others who came to pay their final tribute to jazz-maker Bod while journalists Graham Tutthill (1960-1965) and Terry Sutton (1940-47) covered the event.

On leaving school Bod was employed in a Dover bank, slaved away in London, returned to his beloved Dover to work even harder as a grinder at Dover Engineering Works, took The Grapes pub as licensee which he persuaded the brewers to change the name to the Louis Armstrong and then bought the place to turn it into one of East Kent's most popular jazz centres. In his younger days Bod rowed for Dover in south coast regattas.

Yes, he was quite a character.

KEITH FORWARD MBE (1934-40)

Keith Forward, who lived in Dartford, died on 8 January 2000. Born in August 1923, on leaving school he went to work in the education office in Folkestone while waiting to be called up for his National Service and then he served in the Royal Artillery. In February 1946 he joined the finance department of the Dover Education Office, transferring to Folkestone in 1949 and Springfield (Maidstone) in 1954 when he went to work in the Further Education branch. He became Assistant Education Officer in Dartford in 1965 and Education Officer in 1975. He was particularly interested in children with special needs and in 1983 he was awarded the MBE for his work - his job being very much his life.

Retiring in 1985 he served as a governor of special schools and worked on a voluntary basis in the Rochester Diocese Education Department. He and his wife Betty enjoyed travelling with their family - they have two children, Carolyn and Christopher - and Keith was also a keen stamp collector.

DENIS ARTHUR GIBB (1932-37)

A former President of the Old Pharosians, Denis was an active and loyal member of the Association and was responsible for organising the London Reunions in the 1970s and 80s. He died on 30 October aged 79.

Born on 1 May 1921, the son of a tram driver, Denis and his brother Maurice (1927-33) were both educated at our school. Denis is pictured in the school photographs of 1933 and 1936 and the Buckland House photo in 1936. In 1933 he won the Form 1A Prize

When he left, Denis became a sorting clerk and telegraphist at the General Post Office in Dover, and enlisted in the Territorial Army in 1938. He saw active service in the Second World War, serving in the Royal Engineers and Royal Artillery from 1939 to 1946.

He was attached to the Royal Indian Artillery, attained the rank of Battery Quartermaster Sergeant, was Mentioned in Despatches and was awarded the TA Efficiency Medal.

After the war he left the Post Office and joined the Civil Service, passing his clerical examinations, and working in the Commonwealth Relations Office in 1948. He served on the staff of the UK High Commissioner in Ceylon from 1949 to 1951, was promoted to Executive Officer in 1952, and then joined the staff of the UK High Commissioner in India from 1953 to 1955. In 1958 he transferred to the Department of Inland Revenue.

He and Marion were married in June 1964 and they had two daughters, who are both Doctors.

Although they lived in Chessington, Denis visited Dover almost every year, enjoyed attending the annual meetings and dinners and the London Reunions until ill-health intervened. Indeed, he sent his apologies for not being able to attend the 2000 London Reunion.

He was President of our Association in 1973-74.

In his spare time he was always interested in music and drama. As an eight-year-old boy he sang in St Mary's Church Choir in Dover and later he joined the Dover Players. In Chessington he was a leading member of the St Matthew's and St George's Parish Players, appearing in most of their productions and becoming their chairman until they closed in the late 1990s. He was connected with the North Surrey Choral Society and the Kingston Youth Concert Band to which both his daughters, Jackie and Alison had belonged.

At his funeral service at St Matthew's Church, Surbiton, in November, past and present members of St Matthew's Choir, Kingston Choral Society and its predecessor Surbiton Oratorio Society as well as choir members from St Mary's, Long Ditton, sang Purcell's "Thou Knowest Lord" and "Nunc Dimittis" by Stanford.

The eulogy was delivered by his elder daughter Jackie.

We extend our sympathy to Mrs. Gibb, Jackie and Alison, and the rest of the family.

ROBERT JOHN HARRISON (1924-1927)

News of Robert's death arrived just as the last edition of the newsletter was being produced, so we were only able to mention that he had died. We are grateful to Peter Harrison (1962-1969) for providing this obituary of his father. He died at the Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother Hospital in Margate in May, aged 78.

Robert was born in 1911 at Borden Camp in Hampshire where his father was a Colour Sergeant in the 50th Foot Regiment. The family moved to Dover when Robert was young and he completed his education at Dover County School in 1927.

He joined the RAF as an aircraft apprentice and served with fighter squadrons at Kenley and Biggin Hill, being posted to Aden in 1933. He then served with a bomber squadron in Iraq until 1938 when he was posted to Manston until the outbreak of war in 1939. His mother and sister remained in Dover and he visited the town frequently and in September 1939 married a local girl, Myra Mackey. They had two sons.

During the war Robert served at many RAF bases and was commissioned in 1941, promoted Squadron Leader in 1945 and awarded a permanent commission in 1947. In May 1946 he was posted to the newly reformed King's Flight as a pilot and flew King George VI, Queen Elizabeth and the princesses Elizabeth and Margaret on the Royal tour of Africa in 1947. From April 1948 to May 1950 he served as pilot to the Governor General of Pakistan. Jinnah, the Moslem leader credited with founding Pakistan, died while being flown by Robert to Karachi. When they arrived there about 250,000 Pakistani people met the aircraft and nearly tore it apart in their frenzy to take their beloved leader to its final resting place. Robert returned to the UK in June 1950, retiring from the RAF in 1956 after 28 years service.

On retirement he set up his own driving school and ran it successfully for four years until 1960 when his wife was diagnosed as having cancer. She was successfully operated on but Robert had to return to paid occupation while Myra convalesced. The family returned to Dover where Robert joined Dover Harbour Board, retiring in 1976 when his last role was personnel and welfare officer. From 1962 to 1966 he was the commanding officer of the Dover Air Training Corps.

In retirement he rediscovered his love of bridge and when he moved to Deal he set up a bridge club there, continuing to play until March 2000 when taken ill and admitted to hospital. His wife Myra died in 1981, which proved to be a major blow for Robert, but he found a friend in Isabella, whom he later married and she helped him through his final years.

Peter Harrison lives at 28 Franklea Close, Ottery St. Mary, Devon EX11 1BQ where he would like to hear from any of his old classmates.

ALBERT STONE (1927-33)

Albert died in June 2000, as reported briefly in the last edition of the Newsletter. On leaving school he went into accountancy with a shipping company in the City but, tired of the travel, started work with Pearl Assurance in Sidcup where he and his wife Ann lived from 1933 to1982.

During the last war he served in REME and, with his special interest in electronics, Bert maintained equipment in Nairobi sending secret messages from Kenya to Whitehall.

While serving his six years in the Army he decided on a change in career and underwent teachers' training at a college at Folkestone. On leaving the college he taught in a primary school in Eltham for 30 years until retirement.

His widow Ann recalls: "Bert loved sailing--we had a cruiser--and caravanning. He always loved his old school at Dover and that's why, interested in music, he gave his violin to the school some five years ago. In his will he left his piano to the school to help the young lads there. He felt the school had given him so much in life."

Bert leaves a widow, Ann, and two sons.

STILL LIVING AND LEARNING

BRIAN BACON (1940-48)

In the last newsletter we reported that Brian, now living in Queensland, Australia, had just joined the Old Pharosians Association.

In the summer, he visited Dover and called in at the school to pick up a copy of the newsletter. "I had an interesting yarn with the assistant head and he showed me around," said Brian. "It was a pity I couldn't attend the annual general meeting because I had arranged to be in the Loire Valley at that time - but one day I will make it."

By chance, Brian bumped into Phil Janaway in River and caught up with some of the news. Brian's e-mail address is rashers@ozemail.com.au

TONY BRADLEY (1945-52)

Tony, the former president of the association, spent July and August 1999 in New Zealand as a visiting fellow in public law at the Victoria University of Wellington. While there, he made contact with Derek Belsey (1941-49) who, with his wife Jeannette, is living in Silverstream, a beautiful location in Upper Hutt near Wellington. Derek, an all-round sports player and senior prefect in 1948-49, has a notable collection of school team photographs. Now retired, he is social secretary for his squash club and has a deep interest in walking in wide open spaces (tramping as they call it in NZ).

In October, Tony was asked to give a lecture in the Chapter House of Worcester Cathedral to link the making of Magna Carta in 1215 with the European Human Rights Act that had just come into effect. The reason for the event was that King John is buried in the Cathedral and the lecture was timed to take place on the 784th anniversary of John's death. To Tony's surprise, the Chapter House was too small to seat the many who attended and the lecture was given in the nave of the Cathedral itself, a few yards from John's tomb. Afterwards, the Canon Librarian of the Cathedral produced from his coat pocket King John's will - still legible in minutely written Latin, but lacking the seals which would once have been attached to it.

JONATHAN COATES (1990-97)

Jonathan studied Pharmacology with Basic Medical Science at Leicester University and graduated with a BSc Honours Degree.

MARIO DEL DUCA (1989-96)

Mario was also at Leicester University and graduated with a BA Honours Degree having studied French and Italian.

GREGORY DENNIS (1973-78)

Gregory has graduated with a Bachelor of Engineering Degree with Honours having studied Computer Systems Engineering at the University of Kent at Canterbury.

KRISTIAN DIXON (1990-97)

Kristian also graduated from the University of Kent with a Bachelor of Arts Degree with Honours having studied Politics and Government.

DENIS DOBLE (1948-55)

Denis, elected our Vice-President at the September annual meeting, read Modern History at New College, Oxford after leaving school and undergoing his National Service in Germany in the RAF (1955-57). He then served in the Colonial Office from 1960-64 and joined the Diplomatic Service in 1965. He was posted to Brussels, Lagos, Islamabad in Pakistan, Lima in Peru, Bombay and Calcutta, Kingston in Jamaica and then in Amsterdam where he retired as Consul-General in 1996.

Since retirement Denis has been helping to run the Foreign Office Retirement Association, as membership benefits officer, and participating in various societies linked with the countries in which he served. He is a Council member of the Anglo-Netherlands Society and a committee member of the Anglo-Peruvian Society. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and of the Royal Society of Asian Affairs, a member of Kent Cricket Club and the MCC.

In Battersea, where he now lives, Denis is Vice-President of Battersea Park Rotary Club and a member of the Battersea Deanery Synod, and the parochial church council of St. Mary's, Battersea. He also serves with the police on the Battersea Crime Prevention Council and on the committee of the Friends of Battersea Park. He has a special interest in South Asian affairs, is a Friend of the Church in India and a member of the Pakistan Society. He is also a Serving Brother of the Order of St. John.

MARTYN DURBIDGE (1967-74)

Martyn sent an e-mail from Milton Keynes to say: Quite by chance I came across the school website. I was at Dover Grammar 1967-74. I think that was the same period as your esteemed Secretary, Phil Harding, whom I remember quite well, and Treasurer Ian Pascall. Weren't they both in Park House? (Do Houses still exist? They weren't a big thing by the time I left.)

As a matter of interest, I still keep in regular touch with Chris Osborne from my year, but sadly no-one else. I often run an Internet search on names from my time at Dover Grammar in case I can accidentally track someone down."

Martyn says it would be good if Newsletters could be posted on-line (perhaps available to members only) and he asks if it is possible to set up a chat room type of thing where one could ask "Does anyone know what happened to..."?

* As you will have read elsewhere, we are thinking about appointing a webmaster, so it might be possible - watch this space - or cyberspace! - Ed

DANIEL DYER (1990-97)

Daniel obtained a Bachelor of Science Degree with Honours at the University of Kent where he studied Computer Science.

PAUL EDWARDS (1989-96)

Paul studied at Royal Holloway, University of London, and obtained an Honours Degree in Mathematics with Operational Research.

CHRIS FARMER (1982-88)

A member of Astor House when he was at the school, Chris moved to Southport in Merseyside 12 months after leaving our school. Now married with two children, aged four and five, he works in a software house in Southport and has just finished studying for an Open University degree. He contacted the school in November and asked to include his e-mail address, which is cfarmer@btinternet.com, as he would like to hear from anyone in his year who would like to get in contact.

REX FLETCHER (1971-79)

Rex sent an e-mail to thank us for the latest edition of the newsletter. "I was recently in touch by letter regarding a Colman era year photograph ... I think you were hunting for one a year or so ago to form a set. I am interested in getting a copy should one be discovered. Also I was pleased to read about David Cartwright since we both joined the school in the same year from Eastry Primary. The New Tower looks impressive and blends well."

ROBERT HACKETT (1991-97)

Robert read Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Kent and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Degree with Honours.

STEFAN HARGRAVE (1989-96)

As mentioned elsewhere in this newsletter, we often have trouble keeping in contact with "new" old boys once they have left school, gone through university, and moved elsewhere to find employment. So we are particularly grateful to Stefan for thinking about our plight, and sending us the following details.

I'm writing on behalf of some of the newish old boys (1989-96) to let you know how we are getting on and about out mini invasion of Southampton.

Currently in Southampton we have myself (Stefan Hargrave 89-96, Port House Captain) who after graduating from Brunel with a BSc (Hons) in Economics has moved to Southampton to work for Skandia Life, Risk Services on their graduate scheme and am starting my PIIA exams.

Richard Blown (89-96) also a house captain, who graduated from Loughborough with a BSc (Hons) in Computing and Management is now working for IBM on their graduate scheme and learning about different operating systems/languages.

At university down here we also have Johnathon Russell (89-96) who is completing a BSc (Hons) in Business Information Technology after spending a year working for the BBC in London in their e-division.

Studying Acoustical Engineering (BSc) in Southampton is Giles Hodges who is now entering into his second year.

Elsewhere in the country we have:

Douglas Fawcett (89-93) who is completing his masters in epidemeology having completed his MA in Geography at Manchester.

Chris Birt (89-96) has completed his MEng in civil engineering at the University of Leeds and is now working in Leeds having spent a year studying in Canada.

Greg Harris (89-96) is working at an accountants in Reading having completed his BA in history from Reading university.

Dave Hughes (89-96) is completing his MEng in systems engineering at Loughborough.

Alan Hickie (89-96) studied in Sheffield and received his BSc in maths and is now studing towards his ACCA exams through an accountants firm in Kent. He has also recently announced his engagement to a local primary school teacher from Deal.

Dan Crush (89-96) has finished his BSc Economics from Southampton and is currently looking for work after declining the offer of doing a masters.

Tony Goodwin (89-96), deputy head boy, finished his BA in public administration and is currently working for an Ashford NHS trust in HR and is currently studying for his IPD exams.

Marcus Youden (89-96) has also graduated from Brunel with an Honours BEng Degree in mechanical engineering having studied automotive engineering design, and is now working in Norwich for Lotus cars where he hopes to break into the racing aspect of the company.

Looking at the list above DGSB must still be doing something right and we hope the tradition of boys leaving DGSB to do degrees continues.

Some of us recently met up and recalled things that stuck in our minds e.g. the shear freezing up of the body as you jumped in the pool, the poetic chants of 'Get off the cricket square' from Mr Grant, Elaine who used to serve us in the canteen and the 'zut alors' from (alas my mother!) Mrs. Hargrave. But the one thing that brought more smiles to our faces was the noting system DGSB's worst experiment into punishments although I now hear it has been magically refined!!!

We also pass on our condolences and shock of hearing about the passing away of Bryan Quinn our maths teacher for a year and then as a supply teacher. Some of us also remember him fondly from the school ski-ing trips where he used to go as fast if not faster than the students.

If anyone wants to contact any of the above please contact subtlestef@yahoo.co.uk and I can forward phone numbers, mail addresses etc.

NICK "TOPPER" HEADON (1967-73)

Nick, drummer with The Clash, joined the audience at Gustonbury 2000 (held at The Chance Inn, Guston), in July, at which some of our boys performed with a number of local pop groups. Nick played drums for the grand finale, Jimmy Hendrix's "Purple Haze". He was also among those who attended Bod Bowles' funeral service.

BEN HUGHES (1990-97)

Ben studied at Reading University and obtained an Honours Degree in History.

STEPHEN KEARNS (1990-97)

Stephen graduated from the University of York with a BA Honours Degree in Philosophy.

PAUL LEE (1989-96)

Having studied Accounting and Finance at the University of Kent, Paul obtained a Bachelor of Arts Degree with Honours.

ROBERT LINKIN (1990-97)

Robert graduated from Leicester University with a degree in Economic and Social History.

THOMAS MARSH (1992-98)

Thomas, who is studying at Oxford University, has been awarded an Open Exhibition for this academic year on the recommendation of his tutors in recognition of the high quality of his work last year.

JONATHAN ROWING (1990-97)

Jonathan has graduated from the University of York with a BA Honours Degree in Politics.

BILL SHILLIBEER (1941-45)

Bill, who now lives in London, made contact with Terry Sutton after meeting fellow holiday makers, in Italy. They lived in Dover and Bill explained he went to our school during the war years in Ebbw Vale. The Dover couple admitted they knew Terry!

In a letter Bill recalls some of his contemporaries including Peter Haddon, John Warren, "Bartie" Cook, "Spider" Webb, Colin Henbrey and Dick Spear. He believes Peter Haddon never returned from evacuation in Ebbw Vale because his mother decided to remain there.

After gaining his School Certificate, Bill joined Post Office Telephones (BT) as a draughtsman-in-training, leaving in 1980 as a leading draughtsman to join "Quality of Service" with BT. "I then enjoyed the best years of my career until my early retirement in 1987," he writes.

A few years back he went back to Ebbw Vale, looking for old landmarks and not finding many of them. "I did find the big house which became our school and is now part of a hospital. The town has changed for the better," he believes. Looking back on those wartime days in Ebbw Vale, Bill comments one of the few compensations was the friendliness of the local girls!

Bill's address is 7 Page Court, Page Street, London NW7 2DY.

HUGH STYLES (1985-91)

Hugh competed at the Olympic Games in Sydney in the Tornado Class for sailing. Head teacher Neil Slater sent e-mails of support from the school and the Old Pharosians as the competition progressed. Hugh and his partner Adam May were well placed for a medal in the early races, and eventually emerged sixth. They are already thinking out their strategy to go for Gold in the 2004 Olympics in Athens. Hugh visited the school in October and spoke at the assembly about his achievements, encouraging the boys in the school to achieve their goals through ambition and determination. Hugh is also visiting the Sports Studies classes in the sixth form to help them with their studies.

NICK TAYLOR (1968-75)

A former sports journalist with the East Kent Mercury based in Deal, Nick is now a special investigations reporter, having moved on from crime reporter, at the Sunday Times in Perth, Western Australia. He and his wife Debbie migrated in 1985 and now have three children. Before that he worked on the Leicester Mercury.

Nick has been keeping in touch with some of the school news via the website, and he is also now in contact with former colleague Kevin Redsull (1966-73).

"Please pass my regards to Terry Sutton who may have vague recollections of me, and to Malcolm Grant. Tell him that I am STILL playing rugby ... even if the legs don't move as quickly as they used to," wrote Nick last year.

But within the past few days has come more news to share with Malcolm Grant, and the rest of us. Nick has been awarded the Australian Sports Medal for Services to Rugby Union.
So now it's Nicholas John Taylor ASM ... by order of the Queen and the Governor General of Australia and the Prime Minister.

"I couldn't believe it. I thought it was the boys at the rugby club pulling a big joke. But no the medal and certificate are here now. Not bad for a boy from Deal Wanderers Rugby Club eh?"

The medal is a one-off award by the Australian government to mark sporting achievement and services to sport in the year 2000 and went to Nick in recognition of his work for rugby union in Perth where he has been secretary of one of the local clubs for 10 years.

Australian Prime Minister John Howard said the awards were "not just for internationalals, but for individuals who have made a significant contribution to sport at the local level."

Nick still turns out for his club, the Roodogs. Nick's e-mail address is now taylorshome@one.net.au and he would be pleased to hear from anyone who was at school with him.

KEITH TOLPUTT (1973-79)

Keith joined the Foreign Office straight from school in 1979 and, nearly 20 years on, realised he needed to update his skills. After negotiating day release and sponsorship from his bosses, he proved his little grey cells were still functioning by achieving NVQs 3 and 4 in accounting. He recently became a member of the Association of Accounting Technicians.

He adds: "After three years of study I now have time to enjoy my family again and indulge in my reluctant interest in DIY." Keith is a member of his local parochial church council and recently appointed a church governor at his elder son's Church of England primary school. Meanwhile, he adds, his trombone gathers dust in the attic. But he does sing in a church choir at Dartford.

After 20 years of being based in London he finally managed last year to attend his first London re-union and found it interesting talking to Bryan Owen and headmaster Neil Slater - and was impressed that Neil remembered him after all the passing years.

"It was interesting to see that some familiar faces never change and sobering that those last seen as juniors are now 30-something themselves," writes Keith who lives at Cumberland Villas, Milton Road, Gravesend.

MACER WATSON (1983-90)

Macer went to the University of Birmingham where he studied for a BCom in Accountancy. In his first year there he shared a room in Halls with another old boy Peter Bourner (1983-90), and enjoyed Halls so much he decided to stay for a second and third year!!! After leaving Birmingham with a 2.1 he moved back to Kent and joined the Canterbury office of Reeves & Neylan where he qualified as a chartered accountant. After reaching the position of manager he decided life in practice wasn't for him and in December 1999 joined Saga Group as a financial accountant, working at Sandgate.

"I would love to hear from anyone who was in my years at school," he writes. His e-mail is macer.watson@saga.co.uk

PHILIP WOODLAND (1990-1997)

Having studied Pharmacology with Basic Medical Science at Leicester University, Philip graduated with a BA Honours Degree.

LIST OF CONTENTS

NEWS OF THE ASSOCIATION
Officers and Committee Members
President's Message
The Annual Meeting and Dinner 2000
Annual Football Match
From The Committee Room
Gift Aid
Mrs. E. King
Always Pleased To Help
Archivist's Corner

NEWS OF THE SCHOOL
Comings and Goings
Prize Givings
Sixty Years On
News gathered from the "First Thursday" Newsletters

NEWS OF OLD BOYS
Obituaries
Members still Living and Learning

NEWS OF THE ASSOCIATION
OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE 2000-2001

PRESIDENT: Phil Janaway
73 Lewisham Road
River, Dover
CT17 0QG
01304 822740

VICE-PRESIDENT Denis Doble
4 Paverley Drive
Morgan's Walk,
Battersea,
London SW11 3TP

PAST PRESIDENT: Rev. John Philpott
The Vicarage
45 Bewsbury Cross Lane
Whitfield, Dover
CT16 3EZ
01304 820314

SECRETARY: Philip Harding
6 Chestnut Road, Elms Vale
Dover CT17 9PY
01304 205007
e-mail: phil@ksfa.freeserve.co.uk

ASSISTANT SECRETARY: Graham Tutthill

TREASURER: Ian Pascall
'Karibu' 45A Bewsbury Cross Lane
Whitfield, Dover CT16 3EZ
01304 821187
e-mail: pascallian@aol.com

MEMBERSHIP Jean Luckhurst
SECRETARY: Dover Grammar School for Boys
Dover, CT17 0DQ
01304 206117

NEWSLETTER Terry Sutton MBE
EDITORS: 17 Bewsbury Cross Lane,
Whitfield, Dover CT16 3HB
01304 820122
e-mail: terry.sutton@route56.co.uk
and
Graham Tutthill
21 Orchard Drive, River, Dover
CT17 OND
01304 822121
e-mail: graham@tutthill.freeserve.co.uk

ARCHIVIST: Peter Burville
Seagate, Goodwin Road
St. Margaret's Bay, Dover CT15 6ED
01304 853267
e-mail: pjburville@btinternet.com

COMMITTEE: Mike Palmer (to retire 2001)
Barry Crush (to retire 2001)
Reg Colman (to retire 2002)
Tom Beer (to retire 2002)
Roger Gabriel (to retire 2003)
Maurice Smith (to retire 2003)

AUDITOR: Neil Beverton

HEADMASTER: Neil Slater

STAFF Malcolm Grant, Dr Alan Jackson,
REPRESENTATIVES: Francoise Lloyd

HEAD PREFECT: Ritchie Hulks

INTERNET ADDRESS: www.rmplc.co.uk/eduweb/sites/dovergramboys/index.html

E-MAIL ADDRESS: pharos@dovergramboys.kent.sch.uk

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

I consider it an honour and a privilege to be the President of the Old Pharosians' Association for the year 2000-2001. I am pleased to report on a well attended annual general meeting in September at which members were willing to renew their service to the Association and the School. Many of those present had travelled considerable distances and the Association is grateful to them and to all who loyally attended. In the sunshine of the afternoon quite a few OP's supported the younger Old Boys demonstrating their soccer skills against the School 1st XI. The Association is grateful to Mike Palmer and his helpers, and to Malcolm Grant for again making this annual fixture possible.

The Annual Reunion Dinner, expertly and thoroughly organised by Maurice Smith, was attended by eighty-seven O.P's. Two speeches were delivered by the Headmaster Neil Slater, and myself. Neil spoke with obvious pride of the recent accommodation improvements to the Sixth Form area and the construction of rooms to house the new computer suites, all of which are now accessed by a newly constructed tower. I spoke of the shared pleasure of so many O.P's attending the Dinner and recognising old friends; of my memories of the School during the war-time evacuation to Wales and of the immediate post war years (and of certain members of staff with affection), but I attempted to place these memories within the context of those permanent themes which exist within the on-going life of the School, and therefore identifiable by Old Boys of all ages. Members were entertained by the singing of a local O.P, Steve Yarrow. His choice of songs proved to be very popular and enjoyable. Members might wish to know that I sent a bouquet of flowers to Mrs. Anne Booth who still lives locally, the widow of former Headmaster, J. C. Booth. I received a very appreciative letter of thanks in which she spoke of her pleasure of still being remembered at the age of 95 and ¾ years.

I was recently invited to represent the Association at the School's Carol Service to contribute to a festive celebration of music by the School Choir and instrumentalists, the reading of nine lessons and the congregation singing traditional carols. The church was full of parents and friends sharing a most successful service.

I have recently written a letter on behalf of the Association to those boys who left the school last July, and who will have just completed their first term at university or their first period of their chosen career, to establish a line of communication between them and the Association and to invite them to become members (at an initially reduced membership fee).

The Association will continue to work for the greater involvement of Old Boys, to act as a focal point of global communication and information and to encourage new membership as a celebration of those years at the School on the hill. The committee has expressed support for the organising of local or district reunions of which the London Reunion is an example - successfully organised by John Booth and Tony Bradley. On behalf of the members of the Association's committee, I wish you a happy and successful year 2001. Please continue to contact the Association and the School and let us know how you are and where you are.

Phil Janaway, President

THE ANNUAL MEETING AND DINNER

Nearly 90 old boys and their guests attended the association's annual reunion dinner at the School in September when our new President, Phil Janaway, took the chair.

The annual meeting was held in the morning when Phil (at the school 1943-52) was elected President.

Head teacher Neil Slater welcomed the sense of historical links that old boys gave to the school and reported that the school was going from strength to strength. The headmaster said the number of boys on the roll was now in the 650s and he expected it to increase by a further 20 next year and then stabilise. He mentioned the acute shortage of suitable teachers but, despite this, the number of staff had increased from a low point of 26 to 45, some of whom were part-time. "I must say I have much greater confidence in the future of the school, much more than I had in the past," said Mr Slater.

Phil Janaway, a former deputy head of Astor School and the President of Dover Operatic and Dramatic Society (DODS), paid tribute to the work of the retiring association President, the Reverend John Philpott.

He recalled the war years of evacuation in Wales and how headmaster J.C. Booth had managed to keep the school together through such a difficult time. "In a way, we too were immigrants, or maybe refugees, fleeing a war," he commented. Phil highlighted his memories and the kindness of staff members including Ted Archer, Ken Ruffell and Bill Jacques whose teaching methods he himself found echoing when a master in classrooms at Astor.

"When we attend reunions, we look for friends. But we also look for a continuation of the essence of the school as we knew it," added Phil in proposing the toast to the school.

During the dinner Old Pharosian Steve Yarrow (a leading member of DODS) and Hannah Barnett (whose brother Matthew was a pupil at the school from 1986 to 1991) entertained with songs and music.

Among those at the dinner were Dr. George Curry (1927-36) who had travelled from Florida and Richard Spear (1941-46) who lives in British Columbia, Canada.

At the annual meeting the Rev. John Philpott (1955-62) handed over the Presidency to Phil Janaway. Treasurer Ian Pascall explained that the committee had carried out the membership's instructions and spent around £4,000 during the year on equipment and other items for the school. Reserves were now down to just over £4,000 but year-on-year the association was just about keeping its head above water. Each Newsletter was costing between £350-£400 to publish and to post.

The election of officers resulted: Vice-President - Denis Doble (1948-55), secretary - Phil Harding, assistant secretary - Graham Tutthill, treasurer - Ian Pascall, membership secretary - Mrs. Jean Luckhurst at the school, Newsletter editors - Terry Sutton and Graham Tutthill, archivist - Dr Peter Burville, auditor - Neil Beverton. Roger Gabriel and Maurice Smith (who organised his 15th annual dinner) were re-elected to the committee. Staff members elected to the committee were Malcolm Grant and French teacher Madame Francoise Lloyd and it was pointed out it was probably the first time a lady had served on the OP's committee.

One suggestion made, to be investigated by the committee, is the appointment of a website editor to keep old boys around the world up to date on school and association activities.

After the meeting some members took up the headmaster's offer of a tour of the new buildings, including the new tower and computer suites, at the school.

ANNUAL FOOTBALL MATCH

A number of late withdrawals left the Old Boys' side for this year's annual football match somewhat depleted. Indeed, two members of the School's squad were "borrowed" to make the XI and then an injury in the early stages means that the Old Boys had to play most of the game with only 10 men. It was therefore not surprising that, after a competitive first half in which the Old Boys restricted the School lead to 2-1, the School dominated the second, retaining the Andrew Kremer Memorial Cup by a final score of 8-2. The Old Boys were represented by Michael Robinson, Russell Cramphorn, Simon Gretton, Jeff Vane, Adrian Bailes, Gary Beeden, Paul Henwood, John Spence, John Stonebridge, Michael Abbott and Peter Elms.

Mick Palmer

FROM THE COMMITTEE ROOM

Your committee met in November when the meeting was chaired by President Phil Janaway, with another 10 members present, and apologies from seven. The treasurer's report revealed £4,699 in our various accounts.

Thanks were expressed to Maurice Smith for his customary hard work and efficiency in organising the annual dinner.

There was considerable discussion - not for the first time - about how to keep in contact with boys in the first few years after they leave the school and go on to university or employment. The President offered to write a letter to the year 2000 leavers, which the Secretary distributed during Christmas and New Year holiday period when most were home from university. It is hoped that a closer contact can be made and kept with leavers in future years. The President is to speak to Upper Sixth a couple of weeks before examinations commence in May, and letters will be sent to them just before they leave in June inviting them to bring completed membership forms with them on leaving day. We are grateful to Francoise Lloyd who has offered to chase these up on the day. Further letters will be available on examination results day and will be sent during Christmas holidays.

Among the topics discussed by the committee was a suggestion that previous editions of this newsletter could be made available on CD. The possibility of appointing a website manager will be discussed at the next meeting which is due to take place at the school on Tuesday 13 March at 7 p.m.

GIFT AID

In November 1999 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that he would be changing the tax regime on donations to charities. This was the campaign for "Getting Britain Giving" and brings the UK more or less into line with the US pattern. The new rules came into effect on 6 April 2000, and this article is to explain to members how they can help The Old Pharosians financially under these rules.

Up to 5 April, the tax on a donation (normally called the annual subscription) could only be recovered if it was given under a Deed of Covenant for at least 4 years. Many members of The Old Pharosians have given in this fashion.

From 6 April this year tax can be recovered on all donations by taxpayers, whether regular or one-off. This system is known as Gift Aid and there is no minimum figure.

Gift Aid donations have to be clearly identified as to donor, and documented in an approved manner. If this is done, then The Old Pharosians can recover tax on these donations at the rate of 22/78 of the donation. The donor can claim tax relief at his/her highest rate against either Income Tax or Capital Gains Tax.

If you wish to help The Old Pharosians financially, the actions that I would ask you to take are:

A.If within the last 3 years, you have completed a Deed of Covenant to The Old Pharosians, with a first payment prior to 6th April 2000, then you need do nothing. The Old Pharosians can reclaim the tax without any further action on your part. When your covenant expires I shall write to you and invite you to complete a Gift Aid Declaration for future years. (If you are not sure when you signed a Covenant, please contact me).

B.Whether you are paying by cheque or by Standing Order, please sign a Gift Aid Declaration form to cover this and future years. (This can apply to any donation already made since 6th April 2000). You can specify the final year of payment if you wish to cancel at any future date. These forms are available from me. I can either send a form for you to complete or I can take the details over the phone or via e-mail and send you a written copy for confirmation. (These methods are newly legal under Gift Aid regulations). There will then be no need to complete a form in each subsequent year.

C.Please pay by Standing Order if you are not already doing so, as it helps us with the tracing of transactions for any possible audit by the tax authorities. The S.O. form has to be signed by you in the original. Blank forms are available from myself.

Thank you for your assistance

Ian Pascall November 2000
Tel 01304 821187 Fax 01304 208497
E-mail pascallian@aol.com

MRS. E. KING

The association announces with regret the death of Mrs. Ethel (Gloria) King at Riverhead, Sevenoaks on Christmas Eve 2000. She was five months short of her 100th birthday.

Mrs King, as many will remember, was in charge of cooking arrangements for the school shortly after the school's return from evacuation. She devoted many hours, over the years, to feeding our hungry ones despite the immediate post-war food shortages. She continued to be interested in the school long after her retirement. She attended the annual dinner in September 1990 as a guest of the then newly-elected President William Fittall (1964-72). William attended the funeral at Tunbridge Wells in January to represent the Old Pharosians' Association and our President Phil Janaway.

ALWAYS PLEASED TO HELP

We received an e-mail from Robert Needham, in Hampshire, asking if we could help him track down an old university friend, Simon Matthews (1977-84). "From what I can recall he went to a Grammar School in Dover which I am assuming was yours. I thought I would contact you in case he remained as one of your 'Old Boys' and kept in touch with the school - he did well at university gaining a 1st class honours in Applied Biology. I lost contact with him shortly after graduation - I know he was a member of the YCA and that he was at one time working abroad in Australia. But that is all I know." Sure enough, we were able to put them in contact and they are now keeping up to date with each other's progress.

In the last newsletter we asked if anyone could help Freda Robbins, from Maidstone, with a copy of "Buckland 1852 -1952" by Miss O.M. Rookwood, who was a teacher at our school in the 1940s, to help with family research. Our thanks to those who responded immediately, and Freda now has a copy.

ARCHIVIST'S CORNER

Greetings! Your archive team, which includes Arthur Tolputt (1934-40) and Norman Woolhouse (1946-52), continue to come up to the School on an occasional basis - mostly Monday mornings, and are pleased to welcome visitors. Recently, past-president Dr Ken Lott (1945-53) called in at the School. Ken has offered to help naming people on the July 1946 panoramic photograph. Recently Colin Bailey (1941-48) has also provided some names so we should soon have quite a substantial number of people named (only one name per person, if possible!).

Perhaps some of you remember Professor James Hancock (1941-1948). Recently Charles Hutchins (1936-41), an old BT colleague of mine, rang to say his widow has kindly offered to send us some material for the archives. Records from the war period are rather sparse, but not the memories.

Both Mrs. Turnpenny and Mrs Olive Winter, widow of Bob Winter (1934-41), have donated material relating to the death of Mr Whitehouse and the memorial dedicated to him in 1950. My school-boy diary, of the time, refers to us boys attending the unveiling service.

Colin Henry (1945-50) has donated material, including Speech Day 1946 which included a list of Old Boys' war distinctions, as has ex-teacher Maurice Smith (1959+), who seems to have an inexhaustible supply!

Graham Bayford, who with his brother John was at the School from 1953 to 1956, sent a copy of the School athletics team and soccer 2nd XI of 1955. An added bonus was a full set of names of those featured.

Following our meeting at the annual dinner, Martyn Webster (1960-67) has sent copies of the photographs of the 1960 first & second year choir (with many names), and the July 1961 form 1B visit to Dover Castle.

Rex Fletcher (1970-78), who lives in the USA, responded to an earlier request for a School photograph from Mr Colman's tenure (1969-90), by stating he would like one from his time at the School. As previously mentioned, we eventually hope to offer photographs on CD but at the moment we are not able to progress that particular project.

Where are they now?

Past-president Tony Bradley (1945-52) asked about school-chums Roger T. Burbridge (1945-1949), who went to the USA, and Malcolm Julian Edwards (1945-1951). Can anyone shed any light on their recent whereabouts?

The season's greetings to you (if a little late).

Peter Burville

CONGRATULATIONS

Mrs. Ann Booth (widow of former headmaster J.C. Booth) celebrated her 96th birthday in December, and our oldest Old Pharosian Mrs. Lily Turnpenny is due to celebrate her 108th birthday in February. We send our best wishes to both of these remarkable ladies.

NEWS OF THE SCHOOL

COMINGS AND GOINGS

The new school year started in September with the arrival of 111 boys in Year 7 and other years, and nine new members of staff.

Rosemary Ball is a new part-time teacher of psychology. Vincent Crofts is a part-time teacher of law. Michael Harrison is subject leader for economics and business studies and will also teach politics, and Pauline Harrison is a part-time teacher of business studies. Roger McCracken has joined the design and technology department, Daniel Morrissey is teaching sociology, sports studies and history, and Christopher Mortimer is the new IT technician working at both our school and the Girls' Grammar School. Ben Ralph is teaching geography and games, and Carmel Spencer, who graduated in New Zealand, is teaching science.

Five of these posts are new, four to staff new A level courses in the sixth form, and the fifth to look after the new ICT equipment.

In January Stephen Nugus became Head of Science.

Susan Rose married during the summer holidays and is now Susan Clough.

Steve Bailey, who taught geography and sports studies, left to become Head of Geography at King's School in Canterbury, Jeremy Michaels (PE and games) went to Sittingbourne Community College, and Tasneem Shafi (economics and business studies) has joined Dulwich International College in Thailand.

At the end of the summer term, Maurice Smith, on behalf of the Association, went to the school and presented Old Pharosians' ties to Steve Bailey, Dave Murray and Malcolm Grant to mark their Honorary Membership of the Association having completed 25 years' service. A similar presentation has also been made to Kevin Raine, who retired as Head of Science after a long spell of absence through ill-health.

EXAM RESULTS

This year broke the long run of improvements in A level results with an average candidate score of 19.0, still respectable, but not as good as last year. Every candidate gained at least two A level passes thereby qualifying for entrance to university. Among the outstanding successes were Michael Roberts who gained a place at Selwyn College, Cambridge, to read Mathematics, Mark Gabriel with a place at St. Catherine's College, Oxford, to read Mathematics and Computing, and Daniel Trenowden with a place at Leeds to read Law.

The GCSE results were up on last year and the year before, especially pleasing because this was the first group who entered the school under our own admissions arrangements. Top scorers were Stuart Inglis (9A*s, 1A), Giles Barrett (7A*s, 3As), and Nicholas Hayward and Benjamin Langley (7A*s, 2As 1B).

PRIZE GIVINGS

President Phil Janaway presented the prizes at the school's guest
evening on Friday September 15. Old Pharosian John English (1966-73) returned to the school on Thursday 9 November to present the records of achievement, GCSE certificates and Year 11 prizes. John has also been chairman of the governors and is a parent at the school.

SIXTY YEARS ON

Sixty years ago boys from our school, evacuated to South Wales, were being easily beaten at rugby by the boys of Ebbw Vale County School. Not surprising. They had been playing the game for years. Our school for a few months.

Now Dover Rugby Football Club is planning to send an Under-14s team back to South Wales for possible revenge! Club President is Maurice Sayers (1939-42) who was one of those young rugby players in Ebbw Vale all those years ago. There are currently seven boys from our school regularly training and playing in the team, one of whom is also in the Kent team.

Gareth, from our school, is the son of Tony Hewer who was a pupil at Ebbw Vale Grammar School. Richard Catt, chairman of the youth section of Dover RFC, points out it's going to cost money to send the Dover lads to Wales and Ebbw Vale. So he and his club are organising a series of fund-raising events. The first is a cabaret evening on 10 February. Anyone who wants more information can contact Mr Catt on his work number 01304 203443.

NEWS GATHERED FROM THE
"FIRST THURSDAY" NEWSLETTERS

The cost of a school lunch increased to £1.40 in September. The school runs its own catering concession.

Various educational trips have taken place during the summer and autumn terms, including to La Coupole, Tate Modern, British Museum, Museum of London, the Houses of Parliament, The Somme, Hastings, Salisbury and Cologne.

Year 12 students took part in a Youth Crime and Punishment conference and a political conference, both in London, and visited Canterbury Crown Court.

About 10 students from Years 12 and 13 have been invited to take part in a European Work Placement/exchange in Brittany in April this year. Students from a school in Southern Germany visited the school in September.

The "Jeans for Genes" Day raised £580 .

In July, 12 sixth form art students visited Demelza House Children's Hospice near Sittingbourne for the unveiling of their panels produced during art lessons and free periods. The Hospice authorities had asked our boys to produce these panels following the success of a similar project two years earlier.

A Summer School for 27 highly able children from Years 6 and 7 was held for the first time at our school. Activities included visits to St. Augustine's Abbey in Canterbury and the historic town of Montreuil in France, drama based on the Canterbury Tales, measuring the height of the school flagpole and learning about the Dover Bronze Age boat. The children produced work in English, History, Maths, Science and French.

The school's musicians presented their annual summer concert in July, and performed at the Junior Prize Giving the same month, Guest Evening in September, a Flower Festival concert at Charlton Church, the autumn concert following the Governors' Annual Parents' Meeting in October, and the GCSE Prize Giving in November. The music was at its usual very high standard at the annual Service of Nine Lessons and Carols by Candlelight in December at Charlton Church at which our President read one of the lessons.

CCF cadets took part in the annual national shooting competition at Aldershot in September. Brigadier Trevor Minter, Deputy Constable of Dover Castle, was the Inspecting Officer for the biennial inspection.

The Staff v Prefects cricket match, played at Crabble, resulted in a five-run win for the Staff.

Our Year 8 boys won the annual seven-a-side football tournament for the second successive year.

Year 10 made the school's first ever foray into the Daily Mail's Schools Rugby Cup competition playing host to Clofe's School of Lee, South East London, at Crabble. Although we were beaten, 12-22, our boys did themselves and the school proud.

NEWS OF OLD BOYS

OBITUARIES

BOD BOWLES (1941-47)

Few old boys could have received such a splendid send-off.

A police escort closed off the roads as a jazz band and more than one hundred friends walked to church for the funeral of Robert "Bod" Bowles.

Bod, who died aged 70 in October, was the owner of the Louis Armstrong pub (once The Grapes) in Maison Dieu Road which he turned into a centre for jazz in East Kent. His widow Jackie and their two daughters were determined to give Bod a good send-off, before cremation at Barham.

Two jet black horses hauled the hearse in front of which marched, in New Orleans' jazz style, a 14-piece band. Behind followed more than a hundred friends, old school mates, pub customers, and those who just love jazz. They all processed to St. Paul's RC Church where Bod's family had worshipped for years. As the coffin was carried into church the jazz band played "When The Saints Go Marching In".

Inside the church, school "old boy" Bill Barnacle and his six-strong jazz band played Bod's favourites including his signature tune "The White Cliffs of Dover".

One-time classmate, and best man at Bod's wedding, John "Shuny" Talbot (1942-47), now living in Bristol, recalled some of the highlights of Bod's life that made him such a character in the Dover area. John recalled how Bod's former classmate Terry Sutton, while serving in the Hussars in North Africa, had discovered Bod on a quayside negotiating the sale of blankets to an Arab--while another Arab held his rifle! John, now an experienced trumpeter, told how Bod had introduced him to jazz many years ago.

Father John Ryan, conducting the service, noted one of the tunes played by the jazzmen--"Over In The Glory Land".

There were many school old boys at the church and at the wake that followed in the "Louis." "Met" Simmonds (1941-1947) had to be re-introduced to his old classmate Colin Chapman. Time changes us all! Bob Adams (1955-59), John Talbot's son Steve (1971-78), retired solicitor Maurice Sayers (1939-42), and rock drummer Nick Headon (1967-73) were just some of the others who came to pay their final tribute to jazz-maker Bod while journalists Graham Tutthill (1960-1965) and Terry Sutton (1940-47) covered the event.

On leaving school Bod was employed in a Dover bank, slaved away in London, returned to his beloved Dover to work even harder as a grinder at Dover Engineering Works, took The Grapes pub as licensee which he persuaded the brewers to change the name to the Louis Armstrong and then bought the place to turn it into one of East Kent's most popular jazz centres. In his younger days Bod rowed for Dover in south coast regattas.

Yes, he was quite a character.

KEITH FORWARD MBE (1934-40)

Keith Forward, who lived in Dartford, died on 8 January 2000. Born in August 1923, on leaving school he went to work in the education office in Folkestone while waiting to be called up for his National Service and then he served in the Royal Artillery. In February 1946 he joined the finance department of the Dover Education Office, transferring to Folkestone in 1949 and Springfield (Maidstone) in 1954 when he went to work in the Further Education branch. He became Assistant Education Officer in Dartford in 1965 and Education Officer in 1975. He was particularly interested in children with special needs and in 1983 he was awarded the MBE for his work - his job being very much his life.

Retiring in 1985 he served as a governor of special schools and worked on a voluntary basis in the Rochester Diocese Education Department. He and his wife Betty enjoyed travelling with their family - they have two children, Carolyn and Christopher - and Keith was also a keen stamp collector.

DENIS ARTHUR GIBB (1932-37)

A former President of the Old Pharosians, Denis was an active and loyal member of the Association and was responsible for organising the London Reunions in the 1970s and 80s. He died on 30 October aged 79.

Born on 1 May 1921, the son of a tram driver, Denis and his brother Maurice (1927-33) were both educated at our school. Denis is pictured in the school photographs of 1933 and 1936 and the Buckland House photo in 1936. In 1933 he won the Form 1A Prize

When he left, Denis became a sorting clerk and telegraphist at the General Post Office in Dover, and enlisted in the Territorial Army in 1938. He saw active service in the Second World War, serving in the Royal Engineers and Royal Artillery from 1939 to 1946.

He was attached to the Royal Indian Artillery, attained the rank of Battery Quartermaster Sergeant, was Mentioned in Despatches and was awarded the TA Efficiency Medal.

After the war he left the Post Office and joined the Civil Service, passing his clerical examinations, and working in the Commonwealth Relations Office in 1948. He served on the staff of the UK High Commissioner in Ceylon from 1949 to 1951, was promoted to Executive Officer in 1952, and then joined the staff of the UK High Commissioner in India from 1953 to 1955. In 1958 he transferred to the Department of Inland Revenue.

He and Marion were married in June 1964 and they had two daughters, who are both Doctors.

Although they lived in Chessington, Denis visited Dover almost every year, enjoyed attending the annual meetings and dinners and the London Reunions until ill-health intervened. Indeed, he sent his apologies for not being able to attend the 2000 London Reunion.

He was President of our Association in 1973-74.

In his spare time he was always interested in music and drama. As an eight-year-old boy he sang in St Mary's Church Choir in Dover and later he joined the Dover Players. In Chessington he was a leading member of the St Matthew's and St George's Parish Players, appearing in most of their productions and becoming their chairman until they closed in the late 1990s. He was connected with the North Surrey Choral Society and the Kingston Youth Concert Band to which both his daughters, Jackie and Alison had belonged.

At his funeral service at St Matthew's Church, Surbiton, in November, past and present members of St Matthew's Choir, Kingston Choral Society and its predecessor Surbiton Oratorio Society as well as choir members from St Mary's, Long Ditton, sang Purcell's "Thou Knowest Lord" and "Nunc Dimittis" by Stanford.

The eulogy was delivered by his elder daughter Jackie.

We extend our sympathy to Mrs. Gibb, Jackie and Alison, and the rest of the family.

ROBERT JOHN HARRISON (1924-1927)

News of Robert's death arrived just as the last edition of the newsletter was being produced, so we were only able to mention that he had died. We are grateful to Peter Harrison (1962-1969) for providing this obituary of his father. He died at the Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother Hospital in Margate in May, aged 78.

Robert was born in 1911 at Borden Camp in Hampshire where his father was a Colour Sergeant in the 50th Foot Regiment. The family moved to Dover when Robert was young and he completed his education at Dover County School in 1927.

He joined the RAF as an aircraft apprentice and served with fighter squadrons at Kenley and Biggin Hill, being posted to Aden in 1933. He then served with a bomber squadron in Iraq until 1938 when he was posted to Manston until the outbreak of war in 1939. His mother and sister remained in Dover and he visited the town frequently and in September 1939 married a local girl, Myra Mackey. They had two sons.

During the war Robert served at many RAF bases and was commissioned in 1941, promoted Squadron Leader in 1945 and awarded a permanent commission in 1947. In May 1946 he was posted to the newly reformed King's Flight as a pilot and flew King George VI, Queen Elizabeth and the princesses Elizabeth and Margaret on the Royal tour of Africa in 1947. From April 1948 to May 1950 he served as pilot to the Governor General of Pakistan. Jinnah, the Moslem leader credited with founding Pakistan, died while being flown by Robert to Karachi. When they arrived there about 250,000 Pakistani people met the aircraft and nearly tore it apart in their frenzy to take their beloved leader to its final resting place. Robert returned to the UK in June 1950, retiring from the RAF in 1956 after 28 years service.

On retirement he set up his own driving school and ran it successfully for four years until 1960 when his wife was diagnosed as having cancer. She was successfully operated on but Robert had to return to paid occupation while Myra convalesced. The family returned to Dover where Robert joined Dover Harbour Board, retiring in 1976 when his last role was personnel and welfare officer. From 1962 to 1966 he was the commanding officer of the Dover Air Training Corps.

In retirement he rediscovered his love of bridge and when he moved to Deal he set up a bridge club there, continuing to play until March 2000 when taken ill and admitted to hospital. His wife Myra died in 1981, which proved to be a major blow for Robert, but he found a friend in Isabella, whom he later married and she helped him through his final years.

Peter Harrison lives at 28 Franklea Close, Ottery St. Mary, Devon EX11 1BQ where he would like to hear from any of his old classmates.

ALBERT STONE (1927-33)

Albert died in June 2000, as reported briefly in the last edition of the Newsletter. On leaving school he went into accountancy with a shipping company in the City but, tired of the travel, started work with Pearl Assurance in Sidcup where he and his wife Ann lived from 1933 to1982.

During the last war he served in REME and, with his special interest in electronics, Bert maintained equipment in Nairobi sending secret messages from Kenya to Whitehall.

While serving his six years in the Army he decided on a change in career and underwent teachers' training at a college at Folkestone. On leaving the college he taught in a primary school in Eltham for 30 years until retirement.

His widow Ann recalls: "Bert loved sailing--we had a cruiser--and caravanning. He always loved his old school at Dover and that's why, interested in music, he gave his violin to the school some five years ago. In his will he left his piano to the school to help the young lads there. He felt the school had given him so much in life."

Bert leaves a widow, Ann, and two sons.

STILL LIVING AND LEARNING

BRIAN BACON (1940-48)

In the last newsletter we reported that Brian, now living in Queensland, Australia, had just joined the Old Pharosians Association.

In the summer, he visited Dover and called in at the school to pick up a copy of the newsletter. "I had an interesting yarn with the assistant head and he showed me around," said Brian. "It was a pity I couldn't attend the annual general meeting because I had arranged to be in the Loire Valley at that time - but one day I will make it."

By chance, Brian bumped into Phil Janaway in River and caught up with some of the news. Brian's e-mail address is rashers@ozemail.com.au

TONY BRADLEY (1945-52)

Tony, the former president of the association, spent July and August 1999 in New Zealand as a visiting fellow in public law at the Victoria University of Wellington. While there, he made contact with Derek Belsey (1941-49) who, with his wife Jeannette, is living in Silverstream, a beautiful location in Upper Hutt near Wellington. Derek, an all-round sports player and senior prefect in 1948-49, has a notable collection of school team photographs. Now retired, he is social secretary for his squash club and has a deep interest in walking in wide open spaces (tramping as they call it in NZ).

In October, Tony was asked to give a lecture in the Chapter House of Worcester Cathedral to link the making of Magna Carta in 1215 with the European Human Rights Act that had just come into effect. The reason for the event was that King John is buried in the Cathedral and the lecture was timed to take place on the 784th anniversary of John's death. To Tony's surprise, the Chapter House was too small to seat the many who attended and the lecture was given in the nave of the Cathedral itself, a few yards from John's tomb. Afterwards, the Canon Librarian of the Cathedral produced from his coat pocket King John's will - still legible in minutely written Latin, but lacking the seals which would once have been attached to it.

JONATHAN COATES (1990-97)

Jonathan studied Pharmacology with Basic Medical Science at Leicester University and graduated with a BSc Honours Degree.

MARIO DEL DUCA (1989-96)

Mario was also at Leicester University and graduated with a BA Honours Degree having studied French and Italian.

GREGORY DENNIS (1973-78)

Gregory has graduated with a Bachelor of Engineering Degree with Honours having studied Computer Systems Engineering at the University of Kent at Canterbury.

KRISTIAN DIXON (1990-97)

Kristian also graduated from the University of Kent with a Bachelor of Arts Degree with Honours having studied Politics and Government.

DENIS DOBLE (1948-55)

Denis, elected our Vice-President at the September annual meeting, read Modern History at New College, Oxford after leaving school and undergoing his National Service in Germany in the RAF (1955-57). He then served in the Colonial Office from 1960-64 and joined the Diplomatic Service in 1965. He was posted to Brussels, Lagos, Islamabad in Pakistan, Lima in Peru, Bombay and Calcutta, Kingston in Jamaica and then in Amsterdam where he retired as Consul-General in 1996.

Since retirement Denis has been helping to run the Foreign Office Retirement Association, as membership benefits officer, and participating in various societies linked with the countries in which he served. He is a Council member of the Anglo-Netherlands Society and a committee member of the Anglo-Peruvian Society. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and of the Royal Society of Asian Affairs, a member of Kent Cricket Club and the MCC.

In Battersea, where he now lives, Denis is Vice-President of Battersea Park Rotary Club and a member of the Battersea Deanery Synod, and the parochial church council of St. Mary's, Battersea. He also serves with the police on the Battersea Crime Prevention Council and on the committee of the Friends of Battersea Park. He has a special interest in South Asian affairs, is a Friend of the Church in India and a member of the Pakistan Society. He is also a Serving Brother of the Order of St. John.

MARTYN DURBIDGE (1967-74)

Martyn sent an e-mail from Milton Keynes to say: Quite by chance I came across the school website. I was at Dover Grammar 1967-74. I think that was the same period as your esteemed Secretary, Phil Harding, whom I remember quite well, and Treasurer Ian Pascall. Weren't they both in Park House? (Do Houses still exist? They weren't a big thing by the time I left.)

As a matter of interest, I still keep in regular touch with Chris Osborne from my year, but sadly no-one else. I often run an Internet search on names from my time at Dover Grammar in case I can accidentally track someone down."

Martyn says it would be good if Newsletters could be posted on-line (perhaps available to members only) and he asks if it is possible to set up a chat room type of thing where one could ask "Does anyone know what happened to..."?

* As you will have read elsewhere, we are thinking about appointing a webmaster, so it might be possible - watch this space - or cyberspace! - Ed

DANIEL DYER (1990-97)

Daniel obtained a Bachelor of Science Degree with Honours at the University of Kent where he studied Computer Science.

PAUL EDWARDS (1989-96)

Paul studied at Royal Holloway, University of London, and obtained an Honours Degree in Mathematics with Operational Research.

CHRIS FARMER (1982-88)

A member of Astor House when he was at the school, Chris moved to Southport in Merseyside 12 months after leaving our school. Now married with two children, aged four and five, he works in a software house in Southport and has just finished studying for an Open University degree. He contacted the school in November and asked to include his e-mail address, which is cfarmer@btinternet.com, as he would like to hear from anyone in his year who would like to get in contact.

REX FLETCHER (1971-79)

Rex sent an e-mail to thank us for the latest edition of the newsletter. "I was recently in touch by letter regarding a Colman era year photograph ... I think you were hunting for one a year or so ago to form a set. I am interested in getting a copy should one be discovered. Also I was pleased to read about David Cartwright since we both joined the school in the same year from Eastry Primary. The New Tower looks impressive and blends well."

ROBERT HACKETT (1991-97)

Robert read Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Kent and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Degree with Honours.

STEFAN HARGRAVE (1989-96)

As mentioned elsewhere in this newsletter, we often have trouble keeping in contact with "new" old boys once they have left school, gone through university, and moved elsewhere to find employment. So we are particularly grateful to Stefan for thinking about our plight, and sending us the following details.

I'm writing on behalf of some of the newish old boys (1989-96) to let you know how we are getting on and about out mini invasion of Southampton.

Currently in Southampton we have myself (Stefan Hargrave 89-96, Port House Captain) who after graduating from Brunel with a BSc (Hons) in Economics has moved to Southampton to work for Skandia Life, Risk Services on their graduate scheme and am starting my PIIA exams.

Richard Blown (89-96) also a house captain, who graduated from Loughborough with a BSc (Hons) in Computing and Management is now working for IBM on their graduate scheme and learning about different operating systems/languages.

At university down here we also have Johnathon Russell (89-96) who is completing a BSc (Hons) in Business Information Technology after spending a year working for the BBC in London in their e-division.

Studying Acoustical Engineering (BSc) in Southampton is Giles Hodges who is now entering into his second year.

Elsewhere in the country we have:

Douglas Fawcett (89-93) who is completing his masters in epidemeology having completed his MA in Geography at Manchester.

Chris Birt (89-96) has completed his MEng in civil engineering at the University of Leeds and is now working in Leeds having spent a year studying in Canada.

Greg Harris (89-96) is working at an accountants in Reading having completed his BA in history from Reading university.

Dave Hughes (89-96) is completing his MEng in systems engineering at Loughborough.

Alan Hickie (89-96) studied in Sheffield and received his BSc in maths and is now studing towards his ACCA exams through an accountants firm in Kent. He has also recently announced his engagement to a local primary school teacher from Deal.

Dan Crush (89-96) has finished his BSc Economics from Southampton and is currently looking for work after declining the offer of doing a masters.

Tony Goodwin (89-96), deputy head boy, finished his BA in public administration and is currently working for an Ashford NHS trust in HR and is currently studying for his IPD exams.

Marcus Youden (89-96) has also graduated from Brunel with an Honours BEng Degree in mechanical engineering having studied automotive engineering design, and is now working in Norwich for Lotus cars where he hopes to break into the racing aspect of the company.

Looking at the list above DGSB must still be doing something right and we hope the tradition of boys leaving DGSB to do degrees continues.

Some of us recently met up and recalled things that stuck in our minds e.g. the shear freezing up of the body as you jumped in the pool, the poetic chants of 'Get off the cricket square' from Mr Grant, Elaine who used to serve us in the canteen and the 'zut alors' from (alas my mother!) Mrs. Hargrave. But the one thing that brought more smiles to our faces was the noting system DGSB's worst experiment into punishments although I now hear it has been magically refined!!!

We also pass on our condolences and shock of hearing about the passing away of Bryan Quinn our maths teacher for a year and then as a supply teacher. Some of us also remember him fondly from the school ski-ing trips where he used to go as fast if not faster than the students.

If anyone wants to contact any of the above please contact subtlestef@yahoo.co.uk and I can forward phone numbers, mail addresses etc.

NICK "TOPPER" HEADON (1967-73)

Nick, drummer with The Clash, joined the audience at Gustonbury 2000 (held at The Chance Inn, Guston), in July, at which some of our boys performed with a number of local pop groups. Nick played drums for the grand finale, Jimmy Hendrix's "Purple Haze". He was also among those who attended Bod Bowles' funeral service.

BEN HUGHES (1990-97)

Ben studied at Reading University and obtained an Honours Degree in History.

STEPHEN KEARNS (1990-97)

Stephen graduated from the University of York with a BA Honours Degree in Philosophy.

PAUL LEE (1989-96)

Having studied Accounting and Finance at the University of Kent, Paul obtained a Bachelor of Arts Degree with Honours.

ROBERT LINKIN (1990-97)

Robert graduated from Leicester University with a degree in Economic and Social History.

THOMAS MARSH (1992-98)

Thomas, who is studying at Oxford University, has been awarded an Open Exhibition for this academic year on the recommendation of his tutors in recognition of the high quality of his work last year.

JONATHAN ROWING (1990-97)

Jonathan has graduated from the University of York with a BA Honours Degree in Politics.

BILL SHILLIBEER (1941-45)

Bill, who now lives in London, made contact with Terry Sutton after meeting fellow holiday makers, in Italy. They lived in Dover and Bill explained he went to our school during the war years in Ebbw Vale. The Dover couple admitted they knew Terry!

In a letter Bill recalls some of his contemporaries including Peter Haddon, John Warren, "Bartie" Cook, "Spider" Webb, Colin Henbrey and Dick Spear. He believes Peter Haddon never returned from evacuation in Ebbw Vale because his mother decided to remain there.

After gaining his School Certificate, Bill joined Post Office Telephones (BT) as a draughtsman-in-training, leaving in 1980 as a leading draughtsman to join "Quality of Service" with BT. "I then enjoyed the best years of my career until my early retirement in 1987," he writes.

A few years back he went back to Ebbw Vale, looking for old landmarks and not finding many of them. "I did find the big house which became our school and is now part of a hospital. The town has changed for the better," he believes. Looking back on those wartime days in Ebbw Vale, Bill comments one of the few compensations was the friendliness of the local girls!

Bill's address is 7 Page Court, Page Street, London NW7 2DY.

HUGH STYLES (1985-91)

Hugh competed at the Olympic Games in Sydney in the Tornado Class for sailing. Head teacher Neil Slater sent e-mails of support from the school and the Old Pharosians as the competition progressed. Hugh and his partner Adam May were well placed for a medal in the early races, and eventually emerged sixth. They are already thinking out their strategy to go for Gold in the 2004 Olympics in Athens. Hugh visited the school in October and spoke at the assembly about his achievements, encouraging the boys in the school to achieve their goals through ambition and determination. Hugh is also visiting the Sports Studies classes in the sixth form to help them with their studies.

NICK TAYLOR (1968-75)

A former sports journalist with the East Kent Mercury based in Deal, Nick is now a special investigations reporter, having moved on from crime reporter, at the Sunday Times in Perth, Western Australia. He and his wife Debbie migrated in 1985 and now have three children. Before that he worked on the Leicester Mercury.

Nick has been keeping in touch with some of the school news via the website, and he is also now in contact with former colleague Kevin Redsull (1966-73).

"Please pass my regards to Terry Sutton who may have vague recollections of me, and to Malcolm Grant. Tell him that I am STILL playing rugby ... even if the legs don't move as quickly as they used to," wrote Nick last year.

But within the past few days has come more news to share with Malcolm Grant, and the rest of us. Nick has been awarded the Australian Sports Medal for Services to Rugby Union.
So now it's Nicholas John Taylor ASM ... by order of the Queen and the Governor General of Australia and the Prime Minister.

"I couldn't believe it. I thought it was the boys at the rugby club pulling a big joke. But no the medal and certificate are here now. Not bad for a boy from Deal Wanderers Rugby Club eh?"

The medal is a one-off award by the Australian government to mark sporting achievement and services to sport in the year 2000 and went to Nick in recognition of his work for rugby union in Perth where he has been secretary of one of the local clubs for 10 years.

Australian Prime Minister John Howard said the awards were "not just for internationalals, but for individuals who have made a significant contribution to sport at the local level."

Nick still turns out for his club, the Roodogs. Nick's e-mail address is now taylorshome@one.net.au and he would be pleased to hear from anyone who was at school with him.

KEITH TOLPUTT (1973-79)

Keith joined the Foreign Office straight from school in 1979 and, nearly 20 years on, realised he needed to update his skills. After negotiating day release and sponsorship from his bosses, he proved his little grey cells were still functioning by achieving NVQs 3 and 4 in accounting. He recently became a member of the Association of Accounting Technicians.

He adds: "After three years of study I now have time to enjoy my family again and indulge in my reluctant interest in DIY." Keith is a member of his local parochial church council and recently appointed a church governor at his elder son's Church of England primary school. Meanwhile, he adds, his trombone gathers dust in the attic. But he does sing in a church choir at Dartford.

After 20 years of being based in London he finally managed last year to attend his first London re-union and found it interesting talking to Bryan Owen and headmaster Neil Slater - and was impressed that Neil remembered him after all the passing years.

"It was interesting to see that some familiar faces never change and sobering that those last seen as juniors are now 30-something themselves," writes Keith who lives at Cumberland Villas, Milton Road, Gravesend.

MACER WATSON (1983-90)

Macer went to the University of Birmingham where he studied for a BCom in Accountancy. In his first year there he shared a room in Halls with another old boy Peter Bourner (1983-90), and enjoyed Halls so much he decided to stay for a second and third year!!! After leaving Birmingham with a 2.1 he moved back to Kent and joined the Canterbury office of Reeves & Neylan where he qualified as a chartered accountant. After reaching the position of manager he decided life in practice wasn't for him and in December 1999 joined Saga Group as a financial accountant, working at Sandgate.

"I would love to hear from anyone who was in my years at school," he writes. His e-mail is macer.watson@saga.co.uk

PHILIP WOODLAND (1990-1997)

Having studied Pharmacology with Basic Medical Science at Leicester University, Philip graduated with a BA Honours Degree.